Edutopia: Twenty of the Worst Science Jokes Ever

2 12 2012

Twenty of the Worst Science Jokes Ever

Edutopia LogoQuite a few years ago, the news was ablaze with reports of an asteroid that was going to pass between the Earth and the Moon. Although more precise calculations showed that the path was not going to be that close, the “near miss” was still the talk of the day in my ninth grade physical science class. It was a great day — students were peppering me with questions about asteroids and the solar system. Eventually, one of my students asked about what a large asteroid impact would do to our Moon. I jokingly responded that instead of having on Full Moon, we would have two halves. Most of the students groaned, but I could tell that one of my brighter students was deep in thought. Eventually she asked, “But if the Moon was destroyed, how would we have nighttime?” Very quickly, she realized the flaw in her thinking and yelled out, “Just kidding!”

As the son of two teachers, I learned at an early age that humor — or at least attempts at humor — are a staple of good science teaching. In fact, for years my dad told this joke to his students, “How do you tell a boy chromosome from a girl chromosome?” (Answer: Pull down their genes).

What better way to celebrate the beginning of a new school year and the 20th anniversary of Edutopia than by sharing a list of 20 bad science jokes!

Teacher: Can you name the three kinds of blood vessels?
Student: Yes. Arteries, veins and caterpillars.

Teacher: What did you find interesting about an octopus?
Student: They have 8 testicles.

Teacher: What is the definition of hydrophobic?
Student: Fear of utility bills.

Q: What is the only known thing to travel faster than the speed of light?
A: A Chuck Norris roundhouse kick.

Q: What is the name of the first electricity detective?
A: Sherlock Ohms.

(Full Story)

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-bad-science-jokes-eric-brunsell?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=post&utm_content=blog&utm_campaign=sciencejokes

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